Timing is everything, and the arrival time of your monthly payment from Social Security can be key to keeping your financial house in order.

As you budget to pay your bills and save for future needs, keep in mind that your monthly retirement or disability benefit will be paid at the same time each month. To see your next payment date, create or log on to your my Social Security online account and go to the “Benefits & Payments” section.

In general, here’s how we assign payment dates:

  • If you were born on the 1st through the 10th of the month, you’ll be paid on the second Wednesday of the month;
  • If you were born on the 11th through the 20th of the month, you’ll be paid on the third Wednesday of the month; and
  • If you were born after the 20th of the month, you’ll be paid on the fourth Wednesday of the month.

There are exceptions. For example, children and spouses who receive benefits based on someone else’s work record will be paid on the same day as the primary beneficiary.

For others, we may issue your payments on the 3rd of each month. Among other reasons, we do this if:

  • You filed for benefits before May 1, 1997;
  • You also receive a Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payment;
  • Your Medicare premiums are paid for by the state where you live; or
  • You live in a foreign country.

Individuals who receive SSI payments due to disability, age, or blindness receive those payments on the 1st of each month.

If your payment date falls on a federal holiday or weekend, you can expect to receive that month’s payment on the weekday immediately prior.

You can see a current schedule for Social Security and SSI benefit payments in an easy-to-read calendar.

Social Security is with you through life’s journey, helping you to secure today and tomorrow through important financial benefits, information, and planning tools. To learn more, please visit our website.

Andrew M. Saul was confirmed by the Senate for the role of Commissioner ofSocial Security on June 4, 2019. The vote was 77-16, with seven Senators notvoting. All of the “nay” votes were from Democrats, as were five of the seven whodid not vote (the others were Bernie Sanders, I-VT, and Lamar Alexander, R-TN).

Saul was officially sworn in as Commissioner on June 17. His term runs throughJanuary 19, 2025. He is SSA’s first confirmed Commissioner since Michael Astrue resigned in February 2013 after his term ended. Awaiting confirmation is David Black, for the role of Deputy Commissioner of Social Security. Astrue, along withJason Fichtner, has been awaiting confirmation to the Social Security AdvisoryBoard since January 16, 2019. The Senate has not scheduled votes on any of these nominees.

 

 

From a recent article from the Washington Post:

When he announced his candidacy in June 2015, Mr. Trump maintained that position: “Save Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security without cuts. Have to do it. Get rid of the fraud. Get rid of the waste and abuse, but save it.”

But his budgets in the last two years have proposed reductions in the disability insurance program, which has been part of Social Security since 1956.

The president’s budget director, Mick Mulvaney, who is now also the acting White House chief of staff, has suggested that Mr. Trump’s campaign commitment does not cover disability benefits.

“Do you really think that Social Security disability insurance is part of what people think of when they think of Social Security?” Mr. Mulvaney asked on CBS’s “Face the Nation” in 2017. “I don’t think so. It’s the fastest growing program. It was — it grew tremendously under President Obama. It’s a very wasteful program, and we want to try and fix that.”

The Washington Post says they want to:

If you’re on federal disability payments and on social media, be careful what you post. Uncle Sam wants to watch.

The Trump administration has been quietly working on a proposal to use social media like Facebook and Twitter to help identify people who claim Social Security disability benefits without actually being disabled. If, for example, a person claimed benefits because of a back injury but was shown playing golf in a photograph posted on Facebook, that could be used as evidence that the injury was not disabling.

“There is a little bitty chance that Social Security may be snooping on your Facebook or your Twitter account,” Robert A. Crowe, a lawyer from St. Louis who has represented Social Security disability claimants for more than 40 years, said he cautioned new clients. “You don’t want anything on there that shows you out playing Frisbee.”

In its budget request to Congress last year, Social Security said it would study whether to expand the use of social media networks in disability determinations as a way to “increase program integrity and expedite the identification of fraud.”

Since then, administration officials said, the White House has been actively working with Social Security to flesh out the proposal, in the belief that social media could be a treasure trove of information about people who are applying for or receiving disability benefits.

Some members of Congress, like Senator James Lankford, Republican of Oklahoma, and some conservative organizations, like the Heritage Foundation in Washington, have supported the idea as part of a broader effort to prevent the payment of disability benefits to people who are able to work.

But advocates for people with disabilities say the use of social media in this way would be dangerous because photos posted there do not always provide reliable evidence of a person’s current condition.

“It may be difficult to tell when a photograph was taken,” said Lisa D. Ekman, a lawyer who is the chairwoman of the Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities, a coalition of advocacy groups. “Just because someone posted a photograph of them golfing or going fishing in February of 2019 does not mean that the activity occurred in 2019.”

Moreover, people are more likely to post pictures of themselves when they are happy and healthy than when they are in a wheelchair or a hospital bed.

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